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Yoga prescribing information

I created a YOGA PI based on a review of available literature to help healthcare providers and prospective yogis get an idea about the risks and benefits of yoga practice. Disclaimer: none of these statements have been approved by the FDA. While yoga is not a panacea for all disease, yoga should be considered an adjunct to other existing treatments to help improve overall health and quality of life.

Anytime you go to the pharmacy to pick up prescription medicine included with it is a piece of paper including information about the drug known as a package insert or prescribing information. The PI includes information blessed by the FDA based on all the clinical research and data that led to the drug being approved in the United States. In my former life as a pharmaceutical rep, I was bound by law to only share information with healthcare providers included in the PI.

Yoga has been practiced for centuries yet Western Medicine has only recently begun to study the effects of yoga. Although there is an ever-growing body of scientific evidence that yoga can be applied to many therapeutic areas, more research and larger randomized control trials (RCTs) are needed to be able to substantiate these claims.

I created a YOGA PI based on a the resources below to help healthcare providers and prospective yogis get an idea about the risks and benefits of yoga practice. Disclaimer: none of these statements have been approved by the FDA. While yoga is not a panacea for all disease, yoga should be considered an adjunct to other existing treatments to help improve overall health and quality of life.

 


Elements of the Yoga PI:

DOSAGE & ADMINISTRATION: how much and how often

MECHANISM OF ACTION: how an intervention works

CONTRAINDICATIONS: who should not participate in an intervention

PRECAUTIONS/WARNINGS: possible limitations or side-effects of an intervention

ADVERSE REACTIONS: undesired effects of an intervention

DRUG INTERACTIONS

CLINICAL STUDIES


RESOURCES

BOOKS

The Principles and Practice of Yoga and Healthcare ~ Sat Bir Singh Khalsa
Yoga for Depression ~Amy Weintraub
Yoga as Medicine ~Timothy McCall MD
Yoga Rx ~Larry Payne PhD & Dr Richard Usatine
Yoga Skills for Therapists ~Amy Weintraub

CLINICAL STUDIES

DeManincor M et al. Establishing key components of yoga interventions for reducing depression & anxiety, and improving well-being: a Delphi method study. BMC Comp & Alt Medicine
Streeter CC et al. 2012. Effects of yoga on the ANS, gamma-aminobutyric-acid, and allostasis in epilepsy, depression & post-traumatic stress disorder. Medical Hypothesis.
Streeter CC et al. Effects of yoga versus walking on mood, anxiety and brain GABA levels: a randomized controlled MRS study. J of Alt & Complementary medicine. 2010.16(11): 1145-52
Bosma et al. Lotus Neuropathy. World J of Clin Cases. 2014. 2(2): 39-41
Cramer H. 2013. Adverse Events Associated with Yoga: A Systematic Review of Published Case Reports and Case Series. PLOS One
Cramer H, et al. The Safety of Yoga: A Systematic Review & Meta-analysis of RTCs. Am J Epidemiol. 2015;182(4):281-293
 Cramer H et al. Predictors of yoga use among internal medicine patients. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013;13:172.
Fishbein D, et al. Is yoga really dangerous? A systematic review of adverse events reported in the medical literature. J Altern Complement Med. 2014;20(5):A21.
Fischman LM et al Understanding and preventing yoga injuries. International Journal of yoga therapy 2009. 19: 1-8
Holton MK, Barry AE. Do side-effects/injuries from yoga practice result in discontinued use? Results of a national survey. Int J Yoga. 2014;7(2):152–154
Le Corroller et al. Musculoskeletal injuries related to yoga: imaging observations. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2012 Aug;199(2):413-8
Pryse-Phillips W. Infarction of medulla & cervical cord after fitness exercises. Stroke. 1989. 20: 292-4
Walker M et al. Yoga neuropathy: a snoozer. Neurologist. 2005.11(3): 176-8

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