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Bee Breath

Bee Breath (brahmari) is a breathing exercise (pranayama) that calms & balances the mind. Bee breath uses sound and mudras to help withdraw the senses (pratyahara) to interrupt the negative or racing thoughts that often accompanies anxiety, depression & PTSD and keep you rooted in the present moment.

Bee Breath (brahmari) is a breathing exercise (pranayama) that calms & balances the mind. Bee breath uses sound and mudras to help withdraw the senses (pratyahara) to interrupt the negative or racing thoughts that often accompanies anxiety, depression & PTSD and keep you rooted in the present moment.

MECHANISM OF ACTION Bee Breath (brahmari) is a breathing exercise (pranayama) in yoga calms the entire nervous system by slowing down the exhalation. Mudras (hand gestures) enhance the withdrawal of the senses to keep the practitioner present in the moment. The humming vibrations created during the practice stimulates the thymus which is important for immune function.

INDICATIONS & USAGE Practice brahmari when you need to calm down. Helpful for individuals with anxiety, depression, hypertension, headaches and PTSD.

DOSAGE & ADMINISTRATION Practice 3-6 rounds of bee breath for 1-5 minutes. Rest in between breaths as needed.

CONTRAINDICATIONS No known contraindications.

PRECAUTIONS/WARNINGS If you feel short of breath or have difficulty, take a break at any time and resume your natural breath.

PRACTICE CHILLASANA VIDEO LINK: Stay tuned..coming soon to YouTube. Subscribe to our newsletter to get updates.

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RESOURCES

BOOKS

The Principles and Practice of Yoga and Healthcare ~ Sat Bir Singh Khalsa
Yoga as Medicine. Timothy McCall MD
Yoga for Depression. Amy Weintraub
Yoga Skills for Therapists. Amy Weintraub

CLINICAL STUDIES

Bhavanani et al. Acute Effect of Mukh Bhastrika (a yogic bellows type breathing) on Reaction Time. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 2003; 47(3): 297–300
Veerabhadrappa SG Effect of yogic bellows on cardiovascular autonomic reactivity. J Cardiovasc Dis Res. 2011 Oct-Dec; 2(4): 223–227.

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